Archive for the ‘Terrain’ Category

After the success of my foam card French house project in 2019 I have

decided to be a bit more adventurous and go the whole hog and build

a chateau. I love individually built terrain as it brings something

unique to the table top, that combined with a desire for centre piece

for the table fits perfectly with the idea of building a chateau.

On top of this a lack of ready made buildings is driving me on and

the strange discovery of a beautiful abandoned chateau online has

aroused by creative curiosity.

I discovered the beautiful abandoned chateau online while searching

for images. It turns out there is unique bunch of urban explorers who

specialise in discovering and photographing derelict and abandoned properties.

The details of many of the places are kept secret as once a location is

known it often becomes vandalised. Luckily with a bit of research I was able

to locate the said chateau on google maps helping me get a better idea of

the layout. Sorry the chateau location stays a secret and my chateau name

is fictional.

So progress so far is slow, but its a start and I’m finding the scale

and complexity challenging for my basic ability.

I have measured the whole thing out and drawn a master diagram. I have

also started cutting out the ground floor walls. On top of this I have

started on some of the internal room features such as fire places etc.

I am presenting working on the internals wall and will post up pics

shortly.

Chateau diagram

I bought these two very different glider kits for

wargaming Bolt Action on the island of Crete. The larger

kit is by Sarissa and is apparently 28mm and made from a

combination of mdf and card board.

The smaller kit is made by Hobby and is a 1/48 normal

plastic kit.

Pros and cons, cons first. The Sarissa kit is huge, compared

to the 1/48 scale Hobby kit and to be honest is an incorrect size.

It has also started to come apart along some of the joint lines

and will warp if left near a heat source. I also had to reinforce the

wings to support the weight.

The Hobby kit was quite difficult to assemble and the glass windows

were a royal pain to insert into place. The Hobby kit was nearly twice

the price of the Sarissa kit.

The positive points were that both kits look excellent when painted

up and really bring the wargaming table into the lime light. They are

also an essential part of the Cretan terrain if your wargaming the

invasion of Crete.

If your an avid wargamer and you like building terrain, then this

is the book for you. I bought Volume 1(Winter Wargaming) about two years ago and loved the

book so this latest book(Volume 2 Mediterranean Wargaming) was a must buy and Im not disappointed.

The book is a detailed guide to the work of Pat Smith and all the work he has completed over

the years. To cut a long story short a number of years ago Pat decided to collate all his

fantastic work on the wargamingwithsilverwhistle.blogspot.com and put it into a book. Volume 1

was so successful he decided to do another and thus my blog post.

Ok, so what exactly do get for your £20 of money ? You get a 148 page book of glossy pictures

to drool over and in depth step by step guides to building and painting terrain. There is also

information on painting figures and vehicles.

The exact contents includes the chapters:

  •  Introduction.
  •  Materials.
  •  Terrain mat and flexible roads.
  •  Mountain terrain.
  •  Bridges.
  •  Buildings.
  •  Damaged and destroyed buildings.
  •  Olive groves.
  •  Terraced hills,pillbox and blockhouse.
  •  Vineyards.
  •  Orchards and cypress trees.
  •  Terrain clutter.
  •  Figure painting.
  •  Vehicles.
  •  Guest painter- Moiterei talks Italian.
  •  The scene is set.
  •  Links.

What really sells this book is the straight forward descriptions and methods

of how the terrain is created and with such everyday tools. Nothing in this book

is unachievable to the average model maker/wargamer and is a true inspiration to

just start building and gluing.

I cannot wait for the next volume, well done.

If your interested in buying the book, just click on the .link..
 

This was my first real adventure of using foam card to scratch build a bit terrain
and I think it went really well.

Ok, so why scratch build your own terrain ? Your fed up with the lack commercially available
terrain on the market and you want something different, a piece of terrain that will stand out
on the gaming board as something special. Plus you get the satisfaction of doing it yourself.

I choose foam board as its the cheapest(its cheap if you buy in bulk) and easiest material to work
with. I used Kapa lined foam board as it has a simple outer layer than can be peeled off and then
sculpted. A word of warning, there are lots of companies that sell foam board but I have yet to
find any that easily peels off the outer surface, thus making it useless.

The sections of the house were easy to cut with a very sharp knife and glue together using simple
pva glue. The stone texture was created by stripping off the outer layer of the foam card and using
a pencil to gently mark the individual bricks.
I had the windows and doors made in bulk from laser cut mdf(£20 will get you 30 doors and 60 windows of various sizes),leaving me plenty spare for additional projects.
The outer wooden panelling is made from balsa wood strips, the lower barn type building roof is a scalecast mould
and the taller house roof is made from embossed sheets.
The chimney is also foam board and the chimney pots are 1/48 scale dolls house chimney pots.

I have been playing Bolt Action for some time now and it was
about time I sorted some half decent terrain out.

The aim was produce six terrain boards and ensure everything was
easy to set up and put away with the minimum of fuss. The ability
to stack everything away in a small space was also a high priority.

The boards were extremely simple (2 x 2 feet) and made from a wooden
frame with an mdf base. A styrene block was inserted into the recess and
sealed with masonry paint. I even managed to recycle some old Flames Of
War boards into the process. Each board was given a basic flock coating
and a road textured with sand was added.

I then created a typical Normandy walled farm complex that can be easily
removed and put away in a box. The superb buildings are from Ham and Jam
and come pre painted at a crazy low price. The price is even lower if
you buy in bulk at a wargaming show.
All the building have been modified slightly by me, so foliage added, weathering,
metal building braces, interior painting, interior scatter, interior flooring,
interior ladders and external telegraph points.

I have also created a few items to add to the Normandy theme. So we have green
house, cider press, milk churns, a rusting bike, hay bales, telegraph poles and wires,
road signs and adverts, flower planters and water troughs, a well, a cart and anything
else you can spot. I also created plenty of trees, bushes, hedges, walls and a road block
if needed.

 

I needed some more scenery for my Bolt Action boards and

noticed there is a lot of farm equipment made by Britains that

would nicely do the job on fleabay. Its 1:32 scale according to

the official guide but I think a lot of the Britains stuff fits in

quiet nicely if your not to particular.

You get a white plastic kit in sections for £10 and not much else.I

managed to get a grass roller thrown in as well(it all helps).

I assembled the greenhouse and added some wooden boards for

plants made from balsa wood and added a stone paving effect

path inside.

I then based the greenhouse on plasticard and added various bits

inside giving the look of a discarded neglect. The rusty roller went inside

along with some Noch plant pots and various odds and ends. I also

added an out of control creeper escaping through the roof.

The glass is clear plasticard with a green wash to represent mould and

decay.

And goodnight from the greenhouse.

Built from scratch and meant to fit into a Normandy WWII

terrain landscape..

I went for the disused ,overgrown and neglected look in

the end. I like the idea of it sitting in one corner of the farm

slowly rotting like the apples, awaiting better days.

Perhaps a pile of rotting apples next to it might be the next

bit of scratch built terrain ?

In an attempt to get started on my Bolt Action terrain

boards I am getting stuck into the fine detail. I wanted

something extra and typical in a Normandy farm yard,

thus the cider press.

Normandy is covered in apple orchards and is famous

for its drinks made from apple juice. These include,

Cidre(Cider) apple wine fermented from apple juice,

Calvados(apple brandy) distilled dry fermented cider

which is then aged in oak barrels, Pommeau(aperitif)

unfermented apple juice and apple brandy aged in oak

barrels and finally Benedictine(herbal liquer) a mixture

of plants and spices distilled in oak barrels.

All these were made on an industrial scale and more

importantly a very local scale. If you had century old

apple or even pear orchards on your land then all

you had to do was build a rustic apple press from

spare timber and let the happy times begin.

My simple press is meant to look as rustic as

possible and simply works by dropping apples

into the wooden barrel usually within a muslin

or cloth wrap. The long pole will be attached to

the top and would have been turned forcing a simple

wooden block board down squashing the apples. The

pomace(juice) runs out via a funnel/pipe at the bottom.

Obviously at the moment its not complete and requires

some legs and painting. If your wondering what the silver

bands  are around  the barrel,they are artist foil.

I will post up the finished product soon perhaps with a

scratch built apple run as well.

Oh I have also been making some Cidre bill boards to

advertise on the road side.

Below is a typical Normandy cidre press found

on every farm.

Windmill1

Ok its finally finished.

I ended up going for a simple plasticard base and just

basic vegetation. If the base had been any bigger it would

of limited the amount of places I could of used it on a terrain

board.

So to sum it all up. Due to lack of 15mm windmills on the market

in the Normandy style, I decided to scratch build one. The tower is

made from plastic tube and has modelling clay on the outside giving

the stone effect. The top of the windmill is styrene with modelling clay

on the outside giving the tile effect. I also used balsa wood to make the

sail connection.

The sails are borrowed from another 15mm manufacturer of windmills and I used

an iron rod to connect the sails to windmill. Thus the sails actually turn and

are not fixed in place. The door on the windmill is balsa wood and the windows

are pinched from an “N”guage model railway building.

I tried to go for the overall look of recently abandoned.

Anyway it was lots of fun making it and hope you like it.

Windmill2

Windmill3

IMG_0871a

Things are on the move finally. I finished the top

which is styrene covered in modelling clay. I also managed

to get the connection between the sail and mill sorted

which took an eternity to get just right.

Its presently had a few starter coats of paints on it and I am

about to base it on something a bit bigger. The basing will

help it stand up and keep it safe from big clumsy hands like

mine.

More soon.

IMG_0873a