Archive for the ‘1/56’ Category

I have now painted up a small squad of Warlord Games figures. These figures are labelled mid-late war by Warlord Games but as long as you ensure they have the right weapons for the period they can easily fit it. At the time of the invasion of Crete new uniforms were starting to come through to the troops on the ground, specifically camouflage tops and helmet covers. There are lots of pictures of Germans on Crete wearing mixed uniform. Please note I have not confused the later pictures of occupation troops wearing camouflage which is a common mistake, often made.

I must admit of the all the figures painted so far these are my least favourite. They are plastic
and seem clumsy as in the way the bodies are sculpted. Whats also apparent is Warlords Heroic scale
which shows up the large oversized heads.

They will also need a weight added to the bottom as they are easily knocked over. I will have to raid the 2p jar again lol

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In 1941 German forces invaded the island of Crete in an operation code named, “Mercury”. They used an elite force of Fallschirmjager(parachutists) to invade from the air and the resulting battle would go down in history as a disaster for both the attacking Germans and defending allies.

So you guessed it, I am in the process of painting up a 28mm Fallschirmjager force for operation Mercury and all the other bits needed to complete the project. This will include a mixed force of Allied troops, anti air defence , tanks, Cretan terrain, a Ju52, a DFS 230 glider and loads more.

As mentioned above I am starting off with the German Fallschirmjager force. These guys were elite, veteran troops and highly motivated . The plan to capture Crete was simple, parachute from Ju 52 transport planes or land by DFS glider and capture an airport. Once an airport was captured reinforcement would come from the air as the Germans had air supremacy over the island.

In reality things didn’t go quiet to plan. The Fallschirmjager preferred tactic was to land directly on top of a target(this tactic had brought great success earlier in the war) and use the element of surprise and confusion to over whelm the enemy. Unfortunately German intelligence was particularly poor and would lead to some units dropping directly onto camouflaged Allied forces, resulting in severe German casualties. To further disadvantage the Germans they jumped with minimal personal weapons and on landing they had to find canisters dropped at the same time with most of the larger weapons and spare ammo. Not an ideal situation if you have just landed in an Allied Position !

Luckily the Allies defence of the island was poorly coordinated allowing the groups of spread out Germans to eventually capture the airport at Maleme which enabled them to capture Crete.

The Germans suffered over 6,000 casualties(dead and wounded) on Crete and the Allies lost 1700 and 15,000 were captured. The huge lost of elite German troops and transport planes(350 Luftwaffe planes were lost) were to end the days of parachute drops for the Fallschirmjager as Hitler was not prepared to accept such losses again. The Fallschirmjager would become foot sloggers from that point on.

Anyway that’s the historical narrative covered, now onto the troops and figures I`m going to use. The Fallschirmjager of most WW2 experts conjures up a vision of camouflaged troops armed to the teeth with the best weapons the German war machine could provide, but we are wargaming in 1941 and thus fit into the early war period of the Fallschirmjager.

Your typical Fallschirmjager soldier would have been dressed in a green jumpsuit with a blue Luftwaffe colour helmet. Weapons would have been a rifle ,machine gun ,pistol and grenades. Any other weapons were dropped separately in a canister.

The figures I have used are a mixture of manufacturers. I have used 1st Corps, Foundry and Crusader and a few from Warlord Games. The first three manufacturers specialize in early war troops and I have included a few Warlord Games figures(they only provide mid-late war figures) to show the tiny emergence of different uniforms that started to appear in small numbers on Crete.

These are the first 16 completed figures which are a mixture of 1st Corps and Crusader. They go together quite well and its hard to spot the differences unless you pick them up and really closely check. The bases are covered in a new ready made scatter called, “Mediterranean Soil” by geekgaming.

The pictures below are 1st Corps.

The bottom two pictures are Crusader.

I`m very happy with how they have come out so far and the difference between the two makes

of figures is minimal. I have also started cracking on with the terrain.

More soon.

In anticipation of the hinted eminent release of Warlord Games

breaking into the post war Korean Conflict I have been experimenting

with some of the Bolt Action models already on the market. To be honest I

think Warlord Games have been subtlety changing late WW2 figures for a while,

thus enabling an easy transition into the Korean War. The allied soldiers and weapons found

on the Korean battlefields of the 1950s were not much different from the soldiers and weapons

at the end of WWII. Take British armour as an example, Cromwell and Churchills tanks were still

being used, all that’s needed is new Centurion kit.

In fact apart from the Chinese forces and some Korean heads the models are already in place

for a war.

A lot will depend on what time of year you decide to place your games in. The Korean winter was

especially harsh and had Allied troops wearing a miss mash of clothing in an attempt to just

keep warm. The summer returned troops to similar looking WW2 field kit.

I have used the Bolt Action Commando troops to experiment with as Commandos were actually

present in Korea and they have a good selection of heads with berets and the large back packs

are ideal look for constantly marching look so often seen in pictures of Allied troops in Korea.

I have added a self moulded beanie hat made with green stuff and extra back packs of rolled up

tarps.

Could these be a couple of Glosters patrolling along the Imjin ?

Just an update on what I have been painting as of late.

One 5.5 inch gun with crew and an AEC Matador tractor to

haul it. The ammo pile is just a small extra I made.

This is my finished diorama.

First up are the pictures with a backdrop.

Next come the pictures without a backdrop.

Loads of fun making it and lots of room for improvement.

I have decided to give the Warlord games, “Summer Offensive Painting
Competition” a go under the diorama section. I am going with Bolt
Action and basing the diorama on the picture below. After
that I am taking artistic licence.

Early days so far on my Stug III but lots more to come.

I have been playing Bolt Action for some time now and it was
about time I sorted some half decent terrain out.

The aim was produce six terrain boards and ensure everything was
easy to set up and put away with the minimum of fuss. The ability
to stack everything away in a small space was also a high priority.

The boards were extremely simple (2 x 2 feet) and made from a wooden
frame with an mdf base. A styrene block was inserted into the recess and
sealed with masonry paint. I even managed to recycle some old Flames Of
War boards into the process. Each board was given a basic flock coating
and a road textured with sand was added.

I then created a typical Normandy walled farm complex that can be easily
removed and put away in a box. The superb buildings are from Ham and Jam
and come pre painted at a crazy low price. The price is even lower if
you buy in bulk at a wargaming show.
All the building have been modified slightly by me, so foliage added, weathering,
metal building braces, interior painting, interior scatter, interior flooring,
interior ladders and external telegraph points.

I have also created a few items to add to the Normandy theme. So we have green
house, cider press, milk churns, a rusting bike, hay bales, telegraph poles and wires,
road signs and adverts, flower planters and water troughs, a well, a cart and anything
else you can spot. I also created plenty of trees, bushes, hedges, walls and a road block
if needed.

 

I needed some more scenery for my Bolt Action boards and

noticed there is a lot of farm equipment made by Britains that

would nicely do the job on fleabay. Its 1:32 scale according to

the official guide but I think a lot of the Britains stuff fits in

quiet nicely if your not to particular.

You get a white plastic kit in sections for £10 and not much else.I

managed to get a grass roller thrown in as well(it all helps).

I assembled the greenhouse and added some wooden boards for

plants made from balsa wood and added a stone paving effect

path inside.

I then based the greenhouse on plasticard and added various bits

inside giving the look of a discarded neglect. The rusty roller went inside

along with some Noch plant pots and various odds and ends. I also

added an out of control creeper escaping through the roof.

The glass is clear plasticard with a green wash to represent mould and

decay.

And goodnight from the greenhouse.

Built from scratch and meant to fit into a Normandy WWII

terrain landscape..

I went for the disused ,overgrown and neglected look in

the end. I like the idea of it sitting in one corner of the farm

slowly rotting like the apples, awaiting better days.

Perhaps a pile of rotting apples next to it might be the next

bit of scratch built terrain ?

In an attempt to get started on my Bolt Action terrain

boards I am getting stuck into the fine detail. I wanted

something extra and typical in a Normandy farm yard,

thus the cider press.

Normandy is covered in apple orchards and is famous

for its drinks made from apple juice. These include,

Cidre(Cider) apple wine fermented from apple juice,

Calvados(apple brandy) distilled dry fermented cider

which is then aged in oak barrels, Pommeau(aperitif)

unfermented apple juice and apple brandy aged in oak

barrels and finally Benedictine(herbal liquer) a mixture

of plants and spices distilled in oak barrels.

All these were made on an industrial scale and more

importantly a very local scale. If you had century old

apple or even pear orchards on your land then all

you had to do was build a rustic apple press from

spare timber and let the happy times begin.

My simple press is meant to look as rustic as

possible and simply works by dropping apples

into the wooden barrel usually within a muslin

or cloth wrap. The long pole will be attached to

the top and would have been turned forcing a simple

wooden block board down squashing the apples. The

pomace(juice) runs out via a funnel/pipe at the bottom.

Obviously at the moment its not complete and requires

some legs and painting. If your wondering what the silver

bands  are around  the barrel,they are artist foil.

I will post up the finished product soon perhaps with a

scratch built apple run as well.

Oh I have also been making some Cidre bill boards to

advertise on the road side.

Below is a typical Normandy cidre press found

on every farm.